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  1. #37
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    ky river

    When to Ky. River floods water just rises above the dams and ALL fish can move wherever they wish. Also when the Ohio River level is above ~20' (markland pool) water level is above lock 1, at that point its backwater effect. So reopening the locks on the Kentucky river will have zero effect on Asian carp movement.

  2. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by crappiepappy View Post
    There are commercial packing plants in the area, whose sole purpose is to send these carp to market. Commercial Fishermen are netting them & taking them to these plants.
    Also, believe me ... the KDFWR biologists are hard at work trying to come up with eradication plans for these intruders, but will have to take into account any negative effects that might occur to the rest of the fish population from any of those plans.

    ... pappy
    What about shocking the lake in many areas and scooping the Carp with nets?
    Just a thought...
    Get a line of anglers out there with some type of shocking device(s), find were these carp are staging and shock em to the surface.
    Seems like that would work faster than setting in an office and discussing what to do.
    China takes over our stores, our banking system and now the waterways...**** COMMIES

  3. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by 90Gunner View Post
    What about shocking the lake in many areas and scooping the Carp with nets?
    Just a thought...
    Get a line of anglers out there with some type of shocking device(s), find were these carp are staging and shock em to the surface.
    Seems like that would work faster than setting in an office and discussing what to do.
    China takes over our stores, our banking system and now the waterways...**** COMMIES
    Problem is : we'd have to shock, net, and remove EVERY SINGLE ONE of them ... from every single inch of the Mississippi River waterway and all connecting waters. That, my friend, isn't a feasible project by "shocking".
    And like I said in your other thread (that got moved to the Off Topic Forum) ... China didn't sneak the carp into the USA to provide a food source for us to ship back to them, WE imported them to clean aquaculture/fish farm ponds. They got flooded out of those ponds & made their way into the main waterways ... over 30yrs ago.

    ... pappy

  4. #40
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    My understanding is the electroshocking is not effective because instead of stunning the fish it sends them leaping even more.

  5. #41
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    Update

    From the AP and http://www.theleafchronicle.com/stor...n-ky/18930445/

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – A facility is planned in western Kentucky that will catch, process and sell Asian carp.
    According to a statement from Gov. Steve Beshear’s office, Riverine Fisheries International LLC has purchased a 75,000-square-foot building in Hickman and plans to invest $18.7 million into the project that will create 100 jobs.
    After the carp are harvested, the company plans to process them into products, such as imitation seafood, fishmeal, fish oil, mince and fillets that will be shipped around the world.
    Joe Gillas, president of Riverine Fisheries, says the company is “extremely excited” about locating in Hickman and will focus on Asian carp that are invading Kentucky Lake, the Mississippi River, the Cumberland River, and the Tennessee River.
    The company formed in 2013 to help rid waterways of the invasive fish, which are seen as a threat to native species.
    “Not only will Riverine Fisheries create new jobs and boost Kentucky exports, but it also will help to control Asian carp,” Beshear said in a statement announcing the project.
    Sen. Stan Humphries, of Cadiz, said the facility would benefit the state in multiple ways.
    “Riverine Fisheries International is proposing to create jobs and boost the economy while assisting the state by helping rid the waterways of Asian carp, an invasive species that threatens native fish and other species,” he said. “We welcome Riverine Fisheries’ contributions to both the economy and the environment.”
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  6. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Stewart View Post
    Since I am a guide here on Ky/Barkley here is my take on the Asians:

    They are here and they have been for many years......in the past few years they finally reached such big numbers that people finally realized they were here and the populations were growing. This is happening everywhere in the Mississippi River Drainage System where they can get into. They are growing in numbers all the way up the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, Ohio, heck they are even finding them now all the way up in the tailwaters of the Mississippi.

    At present there is no way to get rid of all of them without killing everything else in doing so..ie by poison etc....this is basically a national problem which will no doubt have a national impact on the economy and our sport fishing and recreation if they do not get them under control.....it won't happen tomorrow, but overtime it is coming...it already has in some areas like the Illinois River. The only concentrated efforts by the Federal Government is they are spending big dollars trying to keep them out of the Great Lakes up in Illinios but it was discovered last year that some have already gotten in there according to DNA samples.

    KDFW has been actively doing what they can. Basically, the only control at this time is commercial fishing to keep the numbers down before it is too late. It is working in some Illinois rivers where the state made a grant to open some big canneries and the state got big contracts with China to send the fish home for them to eat and also selling there for pet food ingrediantes. The problem is the fish spoil very quick and they have to be processed soon after capture so there has to be some big canneries in the area where they are being taken. Here we do not have that. We have on small canneries opened two years ago on the Tennesse River at Smithland below Ky Dam by a Chinese lady and she is expanding but her anglers are working the river. Not sure what the capacity rate is in the cannery now but last year it was only 80,000 lbs per day...a good dent but it is not enough.

    Back to KDFW: The Carp Tournament they had here was to try to get the attention of big money investors to show them just how much weight can be taken on these fish by our local commercial fishermen in a day in hopes that some investors would construct canneries here that would be very profitable. They also have held a lot of luncheons and meetings with these type money folks trying to make it happen....it has not happened yet and I am not sure if it will.....we are keeping our fingers crossed.

    As far as impact on the fishing...so far I have not noticed any real impact yet...except if you are bass fishing and a large school of the big heads move into the area, your bite will cease and you might as well go somewhere else. I heard one of the biologists say they will bully the other fish out of the area when they move in...I know it has happened to me a number of times already. Since they are attacking the bottom of the food chain, eventually no doubt their presence will reduce the numbers of all fish as plankton is the mother's milk of all baby fish. This will take many years here on the big lakes but unless mother nature or man steps in...it will happen. We did have a very large die off of these fish below Ky Dam earlier this year...estimated to be in the hundreds of thousands of them went belly up.....no one has figured out why yet as far as I know but I know KDFW was trying to figure it out.

    Another thing that has come up that a lot of folks are not aware of yet...a number of these fish are now being taken below the dam where they are thick...and they are being taken in the mouth with jigs...means they are actually trying to eat the jigs....that is something plankton eaters do not do.....makes you wonder if the fish may be adapting and starting to eat other things.

    Bottom line here is our best hope right now is to get some big canneries built...we have the commercial anglers here ready and willing to control these fish but at present they cannot get them processed. Big government has not done anything to assist in getting this done.....except in Illinois the state has taken the proper steps. What is really needed is the feds.....and they are too busy bad mouthing one another to even consider doing anything now before it is too late...but then again that pretty much reflects what our feds normally do...that is wait until the crisis has already developed and devastating then they jump in and throw money down the toilet that could have been saved had they acted in a responsible and proactive manner before it was too late.

    Unless mother nature steps in and evens things out like she does in many cases where a species is getting over populated....your kids and grandkids will be fishing for Asians in order to catch any numbers of fish.
    Dave I thought they were starting a processing plant west of Paducah I guess this did not happen. I saw a report on the massive fish kill and the KDFW said the fish had air bubbles in there gills which is a rare occurrence caused by highly oxygenated water. I remember when I read this I thought it was some what suspect it sounded like they could not find a reason and gave this explanation.

  7. #43
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    Let's be more clear

    Quote Originally Posted by crappiepappy View Post
    IMHO ... the state/fed govt have bigger fish to fry, than worry about the Asian carp infestation. Even if the carp problem gets cleaned up in KY, you'd have to totally eradicate every single one of them in every single waterway & pond ... or they'd be back in a matter of years. We also don't know if the deaths of those carp below the dams even WAS a "disease" ... could have just been a fluke "condition".

    I doubt very seriously if the KDFWR has a greater interest in a sustainable industry with these carp. If they invade & ruin some of our best waterways, and sport fishing collapses due to their presence ... do you really think commercial fishing licenses are going to put the same amount of money in the coffers as all the in & out of state fishing licenses sold to people that fish those waters ??

    We may have to be content with having their numbers "controlled" ... since there may not be a chemical or biological solution that rids us of JUST THEM. Remember, we imported them to keep aquaculture & wastewater ponds clean ... then floods put them into the main arteries of our waterways. We have to be careful with whatever methods get used to rid us of them, or even deplete their numbers to a point where they're not detrimental to the sport fish population.

    ... pappy
    We (plural meaning all of us) didn't bring them here. Only a few people did that and they were foolish to not think that they could get into our rivers. I guess they didn't think about their ponds being flooded and releasing those carp out of their ponds into the water ways of the USA. But our US fish and wildlife agency should have thought about that and stopped it in it's tracks. But it's too late now.

    But I just wanted to clarify what you were saying. We the USA didn't all bring them here to the USA. It was just a few fish farmers/researches that made the mistake. And it was a huge mistake as we know now. Hindsight is always 100%. But I wish that we have some foresight that could have prevented this from happening.

    What happens if people stop going to KY lake to fish and paying for guides, fishing gear, bait, housing etc.? The KY and Barkley Lake fishing industry could be hurt if this happens.

    Look on the bright side. Maybe this will cause some of the water fleas(jet ski) to stay off the lake or slow down to avoid being clobbered by a flying Asia Carp? And I'm not going to be water skiing any time soon but I wonder if every other person that's water skiing in the bays thinks about getting a carp in the face?

    I'm pretty sure that If I were a fishing guide on KY Lake I would not want this to be happening and would feel pretty helpless to stop this from going on. Like Dave said he has to move to another spot if the Asian come into his spot that he's fishing. But what if they get so numerous that there is no more spots?

    Why can't we use commercial nets and such and can them for Fertilizer for the farmers and not just for human consumption. There are many things that could be fertilized with these fish even if they die too soon. Grind them up and de-water them and put the dried up fish stuff in bags and sell it to Lowes for gardeners to put in their soil.

    Farmers should be interested in increasing the fertility of their soils too. I'm not sure about the economics of this. To me the limited factors would be being able to net enough of these fish to make it commercially and economically viable.

    I guess we just need to start thinking out side the box some more to figure out a new solution to this problem.

    As to the fish kill. I've studied wildlife biology and one of the things I learned about in those classes was that wildlife population will zoom and boom. That is to say the population of an animal species will continue to increase until predation or disease cause the population to crash. This cycle is repeated over and over again throughout history and could be one of the reasons why so many of the Asian carp died at one time. They got so populated that the spread of any disease went though them faster than normal. This has been documented with other animal species. It's natures way of controlling populations. See the Lynx and Hair or the Lemmings and their predatory prey relationship. Sorry I can't remember exactly which predator that preys on the Lemmings was in that study. Maybe that's on Google some where. I had a paper back book that was required reading in one of my Wildlife Biology Classes and it had all kinds of stories about studies of predator prey relationships and such. I think I still have that book at my parents house somewhere. I enjoyed reading the stories in that book. Sometimes I wish I had majored in Wildlife Biology. They just don't earn enough money.

  8. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcb View Post
    From the AP and http://www.theleafchronicle.com/stor...n-ky/18930445/

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – A facility is planned in western Kentucky that will catch, process and sell Asian carp.
    According to a statement from Gov. Steve Beshear’s office, Riverine Fisheries International LLC has purchased a 75,000-square-foot building in Hickman and plans to invest $18.7 million into the project that will create 100 jobs.
    After the carp are harvested, the company plans to process them into products, such as imitation seafood, fishmeal, fish oil, mince and fillets that will be shipped around the world.
    Joe Gillas, president of Riverine Fisheries, says the company is “extremely excited” about locating in Hickman and will focus on Asian carp that are invading Kentucky Lake, the Mississippi River, the Cumberland River, and the Tennessee River.
    The company formed in 2013 to help rid waterways of the invasive fish, which are seen as a threat to native species.
    “Not only will Riverine Fisheries create new jobs and boost Kentucky exports, but it also will help to control Asian carp,” Beshear said in a statement announcing the project.
    Sen. Stan Humphries, of Cadiz, said the facility would benefit the state in multiple ways.
    “Riverine Fisheries International is proposing to create jobs and boost the economy while assisting the state by helping rid the waterways of Asian carp, an invasive species that threatens native fish and other species,” he said. “We welcome Riverine Fisheries’ contributions to both the economy and the environment.”
    EXCELLENT.

  9. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadrunner View Post
    Dave I thought they were starting a processing plant west of Paducah I guess this did not happen. I saw a report on the massive fish kill and the KDFW said the fish had air bubbles in there gills which is a rare occurrence caused by highly oxygenated water. I remember when I read this I thought it was some what suspect it sounded like they could not find a reason and gave this explanation.
    There are a couple plants down there now.

    Here is the one you're talking about, I think......

    http://tworiversfisheries.com/
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  10. #46
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    How do you Catch them (AC)?

    I am working on trying to clean up Flower Lake!
    I had Harold Johnson (Moon River Foods, Indianola, MS Procurement Director) come Tuesday of last week & we set 300 feet of 4” Gill net, 6 feet tall, monofilament, with weighted bottom (Net 1 on map). We made the mistake of leaving it out too long while we went to lunch. Upon returning 2 hours later, the carp had literally torn it all to pieces! We positioned this net at the entrance to a “long arm” which is about 600 yards wide & about 3 – 5 feet deep. There is so many Silver Carp in this lake that we did not catch a single other type fish. Most of the Carp averaged about 10#.
    On Sat. of last week, I borrowed a “flag” type 4 “ Gill net; heavier nylon string, 5 ft tall, with no bottom weights. Having learned my lesson at Long Arm, I put out about 50 yards of this net (Net 2 on map) & waited an hour, no commotion or “driving” them. Net held up, but we caught so many we could not pull net in boat hardly. I would estimate that in 2 hours time we caught over 3000#’s of Silver Carp!! Again averaging about 10#’s and NO OTHER fish, not even a Buffalo!

    When the Asian Carp processing plant gets going (estimated Nov. 25, but Harry says realistically early January, I hope to have some specialty nets just for the Silver Carp!

    What are your suggestions?
    Researchers in Australia have come up with what they call a "Williams Trap". It is essentially a wall type net that is staked down and has a "fence" sticking above the water line about 12 - 18 inches. The carp are driven by boats to the barrier & jump over, thus being trapped in a box type net.
    My lake averages about 5 feet deep & has a flat, mud filled in bottom. This technique may work on Flower Lake.
    What do you think?
    Last edited by rebranger; 11-19-2014 at 05:21 PM. Reason: typos
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  11. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcb View Post
    From the AP and http://www.theleafchronicle.com/stor...n-ky/18930445/

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – A facility is planned in western Kentucky that will catch, process and sell Asian carp.
    According to a statement from Gov. Steve Beshear’s office, Riverine Fisheries International LLC has purchased a 75,000-square-foot building in Hickman and plans to invest $18.7 million into the project that will create 100 jobs.
    After the carp are harvested, the company plans to process them into products, such as imitation seafood, fishmeal, fish oil, mince and fillets that will be shipped around the world.
    Joe Gillas, president of Riverine Fisheries, says the company is “extremely excited” about locating in Hickman and will focus on Asian carp that are invading Kentucky Lake, the Mississippi River, the Cumberland River, and the Tennessee River.
    The company formed in 2013 to help rid waterways of the invasive fish, which are seen as a threat to native species.
    “Not only will Riverine Fisheries create new jobs and boost Kentucky exports, but it also will help to control Asian carp,” Beshear said in a statement announcing the project.
    Sen. Stan Humphries, of Cadiz, said the facility would benefit the state in multiple ways.
    “Riverine Fisheries International is proposing to create jobs and boost the economy while assisting the state by helping rid the waterways of Asian carp, an invasive species that threatens native fish and other species,” he said. “We welcome Riverine Fisheries’ contributions to both the economy and the environment.”
    Awesome. Glad some uses are being found.

  12. #48
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