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  1. #1
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    Braided Fishing Lines

    Braided Fishing Lines

    I did some research on braided fishing lines and I thought I would share some thoughts with you. Braid is polyethylene (PE) fishing line, and as you will see, thread count matters. Braid lines are “gel-spun”, meaning they are spun together while in partial-liquid form to create “carriers”, or “strands.” Carriers are woven together to create braided line, forming what is known as “pics” at points where they intersect.

    Manufactures make thinner and thinner lines for better reel capacity and castability, but the price is higher. All PE lines are chemically identical. The only difference is in the bundles of microfilaments that make up the yarn. Manufacture’s PE microfilaments might measure 50 to 100 “denier.” A “denier” is a measurement unit for the “fineness” of yarn, equal to about one single strand of silk. For example, if a particular braid requires 800 denier microfibers to reach a certain strength, it can be created by a four-carrier braid with 200 denier microfilaments or an eight-carrier braid with 100 denier microfilaments. Both are the same but the eight-carrier is smoother and rounder since the individual fiber bundles are smaller.

    A four-carrier braid has rigid strength and brute force capabilities which will cut through tough vegetation and is good when fishing rough cover when bottom fishing. An eight-carrier braid has less friction and noise and will cast better. Eight-carrier braids are known as diamond braids because of their two-over, two-under construction. Four-carrier braids are called “basket weave” which is one-over, one under which causes nubs on the surface of the line producing a “singing” noise when cast. Basket-braid line has more fiber integration, so yarns are held firmly in the line for better abrasion resistance. The eight-carrier diamond braids are smoother due to their twill construction, quieter through the guides and more sensitive during retrieve. However, the disadvantages with diamond braids are they can “bury” on the reel spool and be more expensive because of the higher cost of smaller denier yarns. Basket braids are made by taking out half of the eight carriers, hence termed “half-occupied.” However, it is possible to make an eight-basket braid by removing half the carriers from a 16-carrier braiding machine. As we know, different fishing applications demand different lines. For example, an eight-carrier braid will good when fishing jerkbaits, top-water and soft-plastics. When fishing tough vegetation and rough bottom structure, a four-carrier braid may be better.

    In the future, can we expect a 12 or 16-carrier braid that is not hollow core? A 16-stand braid most likely with so many fibers would tend to cut itself, flatten out, have less abrasion resistance and be cost-prohibitive. However in the future, manufactures may research materials with finer denier to improve castability. In fact the FINS company says they are researching a nine-carrier braid which is Spectra High Tenacity fiber with eight ends of PE wrapped around it. Spectra HT is 25% stronger and 30% smaller than traditional deniers of spectra fiber.

    Roy L. (Bonefish) Nave
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  2. #2
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    I would like to continue on the subject of braided lines as to some of the concerns when using braided line. If you have used braid, you know you have trouble breaking it by hand. It will cut you. When tying knots, it is slippery and flexible, which can be hard on old eyes and fingers. As been suggested, palomar or clinch knots are best, but a small tag-end or maybe super glue should be used to prevent slippage.

    Other concerns are braid is visible in water. A floro or mono leader can be added, but a “knot-to-fail” is added to the system. Braid can cut into rod guides. Bury into the reel spool. One should spool line tightly and set the reel drag light enough to slip on hook set. Sharp scissors are needed to cut braid. Braids tend to be noisy and become “fuzzy” and difficult to untangle. It is hard to de-barb a hook once penetrated into the line; most often, it damages the line. Braid has no memory, it floats, has little stretch. One can rip the lure of a fish or even break a rod on hard hook sets. Setting a light drag can help prevent these problems. Braid can get caught in outboard motors and very difficult to remove. Along with any fishing line, it can be detrimental to wildlife.

    From fly-fishing most of my life, I know wind knots can be very frustrating. When fly-fishing, wind knots come when improper technique is used, especially in the wind. However, when using braided lines, the mechanism to which a wind knot can occur is different. One of the most prominent problems with braid is a wind knot. Braid has a lack of memory and releases and unwinds far better that traditional nylon monofilament. A wind knot occurs when an overrun of slack line that has slipped off the spool. The slack line then forms a loop within the spool when the bail is closed. A wind knot to a spinning reel is the same as a backlash to a baitcaster.

    Braid manufactures often add a coating to the line to prevent wind knots, but the coating will wear off in time. The coating can trap water and get heavy. Using heavier weighted lines tend to have less tangles. A good rule when using braid is to keep the line tight, preventing loops from occurring. One should spool line under pressure. You should be careful when spooling braid off a line-winding device because the line does not rest on the spool the same way after a cast. One should not overfill the spool on a spinning reel. Overfilling causes wind knots and tangles. It is best to tie on a 1 oz sinker and cast hard a dozen times before fishing. “Fingering” the line just before the lure hits the water will help. The braid closest to the lure stops, but the line closest to the spool keeps coming off, causing loops. Closing the bail with your hand will also help.

    When fishing a lure such as a soft-plastic if you allow “slacking” of your line, will cause wind knots, especially if you add wind into the equation. One should avoid broad movements with braid. You don’t have to move your rod tip much to jerk a bait or set a hook with braid. Learn to use the reel to help move the lure. The transition between light weighted lures and the fighting fish can cause the line to dig into the spool. Take time after boating a fish to readjust the line. Small twitches are better than hard jerks in most cases with braid. Reeling as you twitch can cut down on slack line.

    Wind knots occur at the beginning of the cast when the braid collides with the rod guides, causing a loop that continues to accelerate. Rods with low profile guides are designed for thin braided lines. Rods with larger guides are made for mono to reduce friction. This is an important fact to remember when purchasing a new spinning rod. Make sure your reel is “tracking” right or “rotating” right which can cause the line to twist without you even knowing it. If your braided line is old, faded and fuzzy, good luck fishing top-water in windy conditions.

    I know I have brought to light some of the problems you may have with braided line, but they still are more smoother, have less diameter and cast further than most other lines out there. I personally enjoy my braid lines. I just have to pay attention to the details to keep my lure moving. I hope this helps someone to understand braid a little better. I hope some of you may add your comments. Thanks, Bonefish!
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    A couple of things I'd add are :

    As you mentioned, braid can cut you pretty quick if wrapped around one's fingers or hand. A piece of wood dowel is a handy tool to wrap braid around to pull a snagged bait free. And I don't recommend using your rod handle, either, unless it's a graphite Tenn style handle ... as braid can cut foam or cork just as easily as it can cut flesh.

    Another thing I would add is to have a pair of Fiskar Child Size Scissors for cutting braid. They're inexpensive @ a couple of $$ at Wally World (school or crafts area) and easily fit in the tackle box. They cut a clean & blunt tag end. That may not mean much to those using Bass baits, but it's a whole lot easier to push a tag end thru a small jig eye (like us Crappie anglers use) if the tag end is blunt and doesn't have shredded fibers sticking out from the tag end.

    *************************************************

    As for me, personally, wind knots have only occurred when I used a wrist snap overhand cast. When I changed to a smoother motion in my overhand casting .... wind knots ceased to occur.

    And I do use a Improved Clinch knot for tying on baits with braid. When brand new, I tie a double overhand knot in the tag, so that when cinching down the Improved Clinch knot ... the double overhand knot will snug against the outside and prevent the tag from slipping thru. And yes, I do tie the braid directly to the bait, a hook, or a duo lock clip.

  4. #4
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    was a great fan

    I'd still be a great fan if i could fish.I bought a spider combo when they first came out, and after that at 75% of my fishing was with braid. there were a few problems at the beginning but a little care and attention solved most of them.My favorite was a20/4 line. Unless I was surface fishing I didn't use a leader[fluro will cut down the action of spooks and sammy lures.I even switched many of bait casting out fits to braid.But the greatest thing about them is using them for trolling. Also no stretch aided hook set on long surface casts. YES it will cut you, fiskars work well and a short piece of heavy dowell will help you on snagged baits.Those of you who use down riggers, are you annoyed by the 'hum" well a spool of 100 lb test braid will solve that problem. but there is a use for mono, and fluro, being a multi species angler, each has its place in your equiptmint.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    huntington ,west virginia
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    braided line

    most braids fade over time, bur you can get a bottle of rid dye for a few dollars. you can find just about any shade you want. also a modified uniknot works well for tying on your lures and hooks. just run the the line through the eye twice and then tie the uniknot. found that idea on a salt water fishing site and it works good

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Sadieville,Ky
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    PowerPro's Maxcuatro Fishing Line. Is my favorite line with a 20lb w
    ith a diameter equal to 4lb test mono. Casts great so thin I'm not using a flouro leader. Will start trolling with it next week.

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